Writing Crisis? 8 Reasons Why & How to Conquer Them: Part 4 of 8

Writing Crisis? 8 Reasons Why & How to Conquer Them: Part 4 of 8

Note: This is the fourth installation of an eight-part series. Did you miss part one? Read it here.
 Photo courtesy of Angelina Litvin on Unsplash

Photo courtesy of Angelina Litvin on Unsplash

Reason 4

I’m not sure where to start.


I'm writing a book. I've got the page numbers done. Steven Wright
Okay. Enough procrastination. I have to write. Trouble is, it's a new WIP, there's a blank page & I'm not sure where to start. #amwritingG. Wakeling @GWakelingWriter
Dear Fear: you can't stop me from starting to write my story... even if I don't know where to start #amwriting #writing #storytellingHelen 2.0 @wirdbyrd

Monopoly makes it easy: The start is marked with “GO” and a big red arrow.

If only writing worked that way.

Instead, writers are expected to create those beginnings, fluff up the middle part, and come to a decisive end.

Yet, the blank page greets us; the cursor flashing over and over as if to chant “write. write. write!”, taunting us with the incessant rhythm of inertia

You just want to punch the darn thing.

My solution? Start typing. It can be nonsense. And, much to my dismay, often is.

But I would rather type something than stare at nothing.

And you cannot edit a blank page.


Keep in mind that you don’t need to start at the beginning of the story when you sit down to write. Anything that has you rarin’ to go can work.Beth Hill
It is said that the hardest paragraph to write is the first paragraph of any book. So, don’t start there․‥We became writers because we were readers first. Our natural inclination is to write our novel like we read a book, from front to back, beginning to end, start to finish. That just isn’t always the correct or only way. We write in any order that gets us writing and keeps us writing.Alan Black
Where you start is where you start, and who says you have to start at the beginning? Your end could be where you begin. #writing #amwritingThe Storyprint

Reason 4 Focus Questions
Write down your answers.
What is the inspiration for your story? What phrases/words/sentences about your story pop into your mind? What is the central focus? What are the characters like? What is your setting? What major event changes the direction of the story? How do you want it to end?


Writing Exercise 4
  • Write anything for ten minutes without stopping. Set a timer and type until you hear the buzzer.
  • Do not pass go and do not collect $200.
  • If you want to warm up first, write what you did yesterday, detail by dry detail: “I woke up at 6 am when the cat started petting my face. After throwing said cat, I stubbed my toe on the dresser and hopped the rest of the way to the bathroom…”
  • Continue until you start writing something out of sheer boredom or come up with something clever. Or until the timer goes off.
  • Keep your butt in the chair and your fingers moving on the keyboard until the time is up. If you cheat on this, you are only cheating yourself.
  • Go feed the cat. Change out of your pajamas and sit at your computer again. Set the timer for fifteen minutes. Write until the buzzer goes off.
  • Take a break and repeat, adding five minutes to each session.
  • Once you are ready to move on to the good stuff, write your character’s names, where they live, what they do, what their purpose is to the story. Then shift to the settings, the conflict, the turning point, etc., until you either are writing random parts of the story or you know where you want to begin.

Learn more about where to begin
Writing Crisis? 8 Reasons Why & How to Conquer Them: Part 5 of 8

Writing Crisis? 8 Reasons Why & How to Conquer Them: Part 5 of 8

Writing Crisis? 8 Reasons Why & How to Conquer Them: Part 3 of 8

Writing Crisis? 8 Reasons Why & How to Conquer Them: Part 3 of 8